Effect of habitual exercise on urinary liver-type fatty acid-binding protein levels in middle-aged and older adults.

Kosaki K, Kamijo-Ikemori A, Sugaya T et al.

Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan.

Scandinavian journal of medicine & science in sports. Mar 2017.

The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of habitual exercise on urinary liver-type fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP), which can reflect the degree of various stresses on renal proximal tubule related to the progression of renal disease, in middle-aged and older adults. Cross-sectional and interventional approaches were used to comprehensively achieve this purpose. In the cross-sectional study, we investigated the relationship between physical activity levels and urinary L-FABP levels in 130 middle-aged and older adults. In the interventional study, subjects (n = 31) were divided into two groups: exercise (n = 19) and control group (n = 12), whereby we examined the effects of 12-week aerobic exercise training on urinary L-FABP levels. The cross-sectional study showed that the urinary L-FABP levels were significantly lower in the higher physical activity group than in the lower physical activity group (P < 0.05). In the interventional study, 12-week aerobic exercise training significantly decreased urinary L-FABP levels (P < 0.01). Furthermore, the relative changes in urinary L-FABP levels were significantly correlated with the relative changes in physical activity levels and mean arterial pressure after intervention (r = -0.374 and r = 0.530, respectively). Our results revealed that the urinary L-FABP levels were lower in the higher physical activity individuals, and aerobic exercise training decreased urinary L-FABP levels. These results suggest that habitual exercise appears to be associated with a decrease in the degree of several stresses on renal proximal tubule and to be beneficial for kidney health in middle-aged and older adults. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. Pubmed

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