Chronic cholestasis in patients on parenteral nutrition: the influence of restoring bowel continuity after mesenteric infarction.

 

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Chronic cholestasis in patients on parenteral nutrition: the influence of restoring bowel continuity after mesenteric infarction.

Eur J Clin Nutr. 2015 Sep 9;

Authors: Adaba F, Uppara M, Iqbal F, Mallappa S, Vaizey CJ, Gabe SM, Warusavitarne J, Nightingale JM

Abstract
BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: Patients with a short bowel and receiving parenteral nutrition (PN) have an increased risk of chronic cholestasis (CC). Restoration of bowel continuity after a mesenteric infarction results in PN requirements being reduced or stopped. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of CC and whether restoring bowel continuity reduced the risk of CC.
SUBJECTS/METHODS: A retrospective review of patients with a short bowel owing to mesenteric infarction from 2000 to 2012. CC was defined as two of bilirubin, alkaline phosphatase and gamma-glutamyl transferase being 1.5 times the upper limit of normal for >6 months.
RESULTS: We identified 104 (55 females, median age 54 years) patients. Seventy-three (70%) patients had restoration of bowel continuity; of these, 25 (34%) had abnormal liver biochemistry (liver function test (LFT)), with 15 (21%) having CC. Following restoration of bowel continuity, 8 (53%) of 15 patients with CC and 10 (100%) of 10 patients with abnormal LFT but not CC had a return of liver function within normal range within a year. Univariate analysis showed restoring bowel continuity (P=0.002) and cessation of PN (P=0.006) were associated with a reduction in prevalence of CC. Multivariate analysis showed that cessation of PN was a significant factor in reducing CC (P=0.02).
CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of CC is 29% for patients with a short bowel receiving PN following a mesenteric infarction. CC resolves in 53% after continuity is restored, and this is most likely due to stopping or reducing the PN.European Journal of Clinical Nutrition advance online publication, 9 September 2015; doi:10.1038/ejcn.2015.147.

PMID: 26350390 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26350390?dopt=Abstract

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